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How Patients Define Value

Posted on December 4, 2015

Doctor Patient

The days of medical providers assuming they know what patients want is ending. Government agencies, industry and healthcare providers all want to know what patients value. What is important to patients? How can we find out? How can we help patients?

Early in my treatment, a doctor walked in and said, “What can I do for you Mr. Clay?” A nice open-ended question designed to find out what I valued. The problem?  I didn’t know enough to know what I wanted or what he could do.

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Ask the Expert: What Keytruda’s FDA Status Could Mean For You

Posted on December 1, 2015

Keytruda

Last month, we updated you when the FDA gave pembrolizumab (Keytruda) breakthrough status, which will speed up the development and review for the drug’s FDA approval. Now, stage IV survivor and Colon Cancer Alliance Medical Advisor and Patient Advocate Dr. Laura Porter gives us more insight into why this new drug and its breakthrough status is an important step forward. 

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The Pink Tsunami

Posted on November 17, 2015

SUSO Blog

Just last month, 300 pound NFL linemen took to the gridiron to do battle while sporting hints of pink in their uniforms. Throughout “Pinktober,” products like cosmetics and cleaners, lotions and laxatives supported breast cancer awareness. While some have criticized what they see as an over commercialization noting that breast cancer awareness month itself was even started by a pharmaceutical company, the positive impact on women’s health has been dramatic as early diagnosis of breast cancer has led to significant improvements in five year survival rates for those diagnosed.

Like many national movements, this tsunami-like wave of awareness began as a small ripple. The notion of using a colored ribbon as a social cause symbol began in the 1970’s when the song “Tie a Yellow Ribbon” inspired Penny Laingen, wife of an Iran hostage, to use a yellow ribbon to show support for her husband and the other hostages. The initial color for breast cancer awareness was actually peach and created by Charlotte Hayley, a breast cancer survivor who handed out the ribbons in a grassroots effort. Then in 1991, cosmetics mogul Evelyn Lauder, as a guest editor for SELF magazine, wanted to work with Hayley and have the ribbons at cosmetic counters; Hayley declined thinking this was too commercial, so lawyers for SELF recommended changing the color. In the fall of 1991, volunteers for Susan G. Komen gave out pink ribbons at a race in New York City and the rest is history.

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What You Need to Know About Processed Meat, Red Meat and Cancer Risk Pt. 2

Posted on November 13, 2015

Fruit Bowl

In Part 1 of our “What You Need to Know About Processed Meat, Red Meat and Cancer Risk” series, Oncology Dietitian Rhone Levin broke down the International Agency for Research on Cancer and World Health Organization’s (WHO) recent report “Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat” (which found positive links between consuming red and processed meats and 18 types of cancer) and gave some of examples of processed meats, read meats and protein alternatives.

Now, we’re discussing reducing your cancer risk and ways to incorporate more plant foods.

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What You Need to Know About Processed Meat, Red Meat and Cancer Risk Pt. 1

Posted on November 10, 2015

hot dog

You’ve probably heard the news on the International Agency for Research on Cancer and World Health Organization’s (WHO) recent report “Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat,” which found positive links between consuming red and processed meats and 18 types of cancer.

The organization concluded there is enough evidence to place processed meats into the “Carcinogenic to Humans” category, which is the highest class of cancer causing agents (the same category as cigarettes). Additionally, there’s also evidence that eating red meats may cause cancer, as they were assigned to the “Probably Carcinogenic to Humans” group.

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