Sign Up for Our E-Newsletter

Colon Health Alert: New Colonoscopy Technology

Posted on March 26, 2014

Colon Health Alert_square

A colonoscopy remains the best available procedure for detecting and removing pre-cancerous polyps; however, due to both technique and viewing area, studies have shown that some polyps may be missed. EndoChoice has developed a new colonoscope called Full Spectrum Endoscopy™ (Fuse™) that uses multiple cameras to create a panoramic view, allowing GIs to see more of the tract. 

Today, forward viewing endoscopes with a 150-170 degree field of view are most common; however, the Fuse technology expands this field of view to 330 degrees. A clinical study was conducted by leading researchers at healthcare facilities in the US, the Netherlands and Israel to compare the miss rates of standard forward viewing colonoscopy and EndoChoices’s Fuse System. Results of the study were published in the March issue of The Lancet Oncology.

185 patients participated in the study between 2012 and 2013. The study determined that standard forward-viewing colonoscopes missed 41% of the pre-cancerous polyps while Fuse missed 7%. The study concluded that Fuse’s expanded field of view enabled physicians participating in the study to detect 69% more pre-cancerous polyps than with standard colonoscopes. Have questions about this new technology? We’ve got answers below!

Fuse GIF

What is Fuse?

Fuse is a new device for use in a colonoscopy. It provides physicians with a panoramic 330 degree field of view (as compared to the 170 degree view common with standard, forward-viewing scopes).

Why is this study important to patients?

Getting a colonoscopy may prevent colon cancer because the doctor can find and remove polyps before they develop into cancer; however, if a polyp is missed it could become cancerous over a period of time. The study suggests that the enhanced visual field provided by Fuse enabled doctors to miss fewer polyps due to the wider viewing area.

Will the procedure be any different if my physician uses Fuse?

No. Your experience is exactly the same.

Does Fuse colonoscopy cost more than standard colonoscopy?

No. Your cost for a colonoscopy is the same regardless of what scope your doctor uses.

Is the image of my colon shown on a screen the same way it is in a standard forward viewing colonoscopy?

No. Fuse projects the expanded view onto three screens instead of one, giving physicians previously unseen views, such as behind colonic folds and other difficult anatomy.

Because the doctor gets a better view of the colon, will the procedure be over quicker?

Fuse colonoscopy typically takes the same amount of time as a standard colonoscopy. The recent clinical study showed a very similar overall median procedure time between the standard colonoscope and the Fuse system.

How do I locate a doctor that offers a Fuse colonoscopy?

Patients can locate a physician by going to www.Fusecolonoscopy.org and submitting their information on the “Contact” tab. The website also lists ‘featured facilities’ from across the country.

Since there are more cameras in the tip of the colonoscope, does that mean it is larger than the typical scope?

No. The Fuse colonoscope is the same size as a standard colonoscope.

How do I learn more?

For the latest updates on this new technology, check out Fuse Colonoscopy on Facebook and Twitter. Also, please leave your questions and comments below – we’ll do our best to get them answered!

More Resources

Don’t forget, the Colon Cancer Alliance serves as a source of information about colon health. Check out our resources to get colonoscopy tips from the pros, find out what you should be asking your doctor and more. If you have additional questions about screening or are in need of support, please contact our free Helpline at (877) 422-2030. We’re here to help! 

The Colon Cancer Alliance provides patients and the general public with vital information about colorectal cancer, its prevention and treatment. These Colon Health Alerts are sent whenever there is approval of new treatments or devices, significant advances in research or other timely and relevant updates related to the Colon Cancer Alliance mission. Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise, does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation or favoring by the Colon Cancer Alliance. The information provided in this Alert is designed to help empower patients and does not replace the direct relationship between patients and health professionals. Patients should not make any healthcare decisions based on information in this Alert without first contacting your physician or healthcare professional.

5 Responses to “Colon Health Alert: New Colonoscopy Technology”

  1. Kathy says:

    Wow. Makes perfect sense. It’s scary that the other scopes miss that many polyps and makes sense that you can find many more with the panoramic 330 degree view. My husband needs a colonoscopy. Where can I find a GI in Pittsburgh using fuse colonoscopy

  2. Nancy says:

    This is wonderful news in the fight against colon cancer! My husband had a baseline colonoscopy at age 50 but they missed finding his polyp. Four years later he had symptoms of cancer and they found it, only it had progressed to stage 3. Full Spectrum Endoscopy will prevent this from happening to other people.

  3. Janet says:

    My husband needs a colonoscopy too. I Googled fuse colonoscopy which took me to fusecolonoscopy.org. Looks like there is a list of locations but, none where we are. I left a message for them to contact me.

  4. Jeannie says:

    This certainly is a major break break through. I have not had a colonoscopy yet. My husband is due for another since polyps were discovered about 4 years ago. It will be very interesting to see what is found when he has his next colonoscopy. Actually it is a bit scary to think that some might not have been detected. We’re looking for a doctor in the Boston area as soon as possible now that we know about this new technology.

  5. Rosemary Manlove says:

    My Stage 3B colon cancer (adenoma) was missed in 2009. I survived 4 YEARS of surgeries, organ removals,chemo and radiation, and miraculously am free of cancer today.

    I would like to know how I can receive the FUSE examination. I became a medicare patient this mo nth; but I also have Plan F and D (the best coverage).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php