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Spotlight

Still a young newlywed when she started experiencing symptoms, Kendra Mitchell finally saw a doctor after admitting she was having issues to her husband. Thanks … read more

Our Heroes

After her mother passed away in 2008, Christina Granderson got serious about raising awareness. In addition to being a longtime Colon Cancer Alliance Buddy and … read more

What's Happening?

The revolution has officially begun. With Keytruda, we see a drug that treats different kinds of cancer with the same genetic profile. This is called … read more

COLORECTAL HEALTH ALERT: Opdivo Approved for MSI-High Colorectal Cancer Patients

Posted on August 1, 2017

Bristol-Meyers Squibb’s Opdivo (nivolumab) has just been approved by the FDA for patients with a microsatellite instability-high tumors (also known as MSI-H) or mismatched repair deficiency (dMMR). The approval was specifically for patients whose cancer has progressed following Fluoropyrimidine, Oxaliplatin, and Irinotecan.

Opdivo joins Merck’s Keytruda (pembrolizumab) as the second immunotherapy drug to be approved within four months. Here’s what you need to know. Read more

What the New Undy/Run Walk Fundraising Center Means For You

Posted on July 27, 2017

We can’t thank you enough for your support of the Undy Run/Walk and that’s why we wanted you to be the first to know about the latest and greatest Undy Participant enhancement! Read more

Top 5 Things to Know about the Latest in Research

Posted on July 21, 2017

This past June Colon Cancer Alliance staff members attended the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago. Each year oncology professionals from around the world attend this conference and present the latest and greatest in cancer research and treatment. Read more

Immunotherapy: The Revolution Has Officially Begun

Posted on June 27, 2017

The revolution has officially begun.

With Keytruda, we see a drug that treats different kinds of cancer with the same genetic profile. This is called being tumor agnostic. In short, it doesn’t matter where your tumor is located (colon, breast, lung, etc.), but what genetic markers it contains.

This has the potential to radically change how we see and treat cancers. Read more

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